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Brake Disc and Caliper Kit

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KCOE2148 Front and Rear OE Stock Replacement Low-Dust Ceramic Brake Pad, Rotor and Caliper Kit
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$338.56
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Location : Front And RearNumber of Lugs : 5 LugsSeries : Autospecialty By Powerstop
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KC2073-36 Front and Rear Z36 Z36 Truck Carbon-Fiber Ceramic Brake Pad, Drilled & Slotted Rotor + Calipers
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$813.69
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Location : Front And RearNumber of Lugs : 8 LugsSeries : Z36 Extreme Truck And Tow
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KC2203-36 Front Z36 Z36 Truck Carbon-Fiber Ceramic Brake Pad, Drilled & Slotted Rotor + Calipers
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$494.47
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Location : FrontNumber of Lugs : 8 LugsSeries : Z36 Extreme Truck And Tow
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KC5490-36 Rear Z36 Z36 Truck Carbon-Fiber Ceramic Brake Pad, Drilled & Slotted Rotor + Calipers
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$726.27
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Location : RearNumber of Lugs : 8 LugsSeries : Z36 Extreme Truck And Tow
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KCOE1524 Front OE Stock Replacement Low-Dust Ceramic Brake Pad, Rotor and Caliper Kit
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$190.30
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Location : FrontNumber of Lugs : 8 LugsSeries : Autospecialty By Powerstop
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KCOE2010A Front and Rear OE Stock Replacement Low-Dust Ceramic Brake Pad, Rotor and Caliper Kit
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$409.80
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Location : Front And RearNumber of Lugs : 6 LugsSeries : Autospecialty By Powerstop
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KCOE2015 Front and Rear OE Stock Replacement Low-Dust Ceramic Brake Pad, Rotor and Caliper Kit
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$399.31
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Location : Front And RearNumber of Lugs : 6 LugsSeries : Autospecialty By Powerstop
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KCOE2018 Rear OE Stock Replacement Low-Dust Ceramic Brake Pad, Rotor and Caliper Kit
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$200.68
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Location : RearNumber of Lugs : 6 LugsSeries : Autospecialty By Powerstop
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KCOE2046 Rear OE Stock Replacement Low-Dust Ceramic Brake Pad, Rotor and Caliper Kit
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$240.38
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Location : RearNumber of Lugs : 6 LugsSeries : Autospecialty By Powerstop
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KCOE2069 Front OE Stock Replacement Low-Dust Ceramic Brake Pad, Rotor and Caliper Kit
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$261.90
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Location : FrontNumber of Lugs : 6 LugsSeries : Autospecialty By Powerstop
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KCOE4627A Rear OE Stock Replacement Low-Dust Ceramic Brake Pad, Rotor and Caliper Kit
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$307.28
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Location : RearNumber of Lugs : 5 LugsSeries : Autospecialty By Powerstop
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KC1232-36 Front Z36 Z36 Truck Carbon-Fiber Ceramic Brake Pad, Drilled & Slotted Rotor + Calipers
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$266.36
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Location : FrontNumber of Lugs : 5 LugsSeries : Z36 Extreme Truck And Tow
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KC1303-26 Rear Z26 Muscle Carbon-Fiber Ceramic Brake Pad, Drilled & Slotted Rotor and Caliper Kit
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$286.56
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Location : RearNumber of Lugs : 5 LugsSeries : Z26 Street Warrior Carbon-Fiber Ceramic
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KC137 Front Z23 Daily Carbon-Fiber Ceramic Brake Pad, Drilled & Slotted Rotor and Caliper Kit
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$431.10
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Location : FrontNumber of Lugs : 6 LugsSeries : Z23 Evolution Sport
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KC1576 Front Z23 Daily Carbon-Fiber Ceramic Brake Pad, Drilled & Slotted Rotor and Caliper Kit
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$304.86
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Location : FrontSeries : Z23 Evolution SportPad Material : Ceramic
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Brake Disc and Caliper Kit Customer Reviews

Nice product, good price, looks good and works well towing.
Purchased on May 18, 2017
THEY WERE QUITE EASY TO INSTALL-NO ISSUES-THEY LOOK GREAT AND PERFORM PERFECTLY SO FAR -I WOULD BUT THEM AGAIN NO QUESTION ABOUT IT.I COULD NOT BE HAPPIER WITH THEM, THANKS!!
Purchased on Apr 07, 2015

Brake Disc and Caliper Kit Guides

Brake Disc and Caliper Kit Buyer's Guide

Summary

  • Selecting the right brake disc and caliper kit for your car will not only restore the brakes, but also improve its performance and last longer than the previous parts.
  • The brake disc connects with the wheel hub and spins along with the tire. It serves as the contact surface for the brake pads.
  • The brake caliper is a mechanical assembly that surrounds the brake disc. It comes in two types, floating calipers and fixed calipers.
  • Brake disc designs include plain surface, vented, drilled, dimpled, slotted, and waved discs. Popular materials for making these discs include cast iron, ceramic, and carbon fiber ceramic. Both designs and materials affect the performance and durability of the brake disc.
  • Getting a new brake disc and caliper kit to replace your old one can cost you anywhere between $119 and $1,127.

Vehicles equipped with disc brakes rely on brake discs and calipers to slow down or stop outright. These components undergo intense abrasion and heat whenever you step on the brake pedal. If you use them often, they can wear out or break down earlier than designed.

While it’s possible to replace specific parts of the disc brake, such as the brake pad, you may need to replace the entire assembly. Selecting the right brake disc and caliper kit for your car will not only restore the brakes, but also improve its performance and make it last longer than the previous parts.The basics of disc brakes

Disc brakes include a disc or rotor attached to the wheel and calipers with brake pads. When the driver hits the brakes, pressurized brake fluids drive the pistons inside the calipers. The calipers clamp on the rotor and press the brake pads into the rotor’s surface. Their physical contact produces friction that slows down the spinning motion of the wheels.

What is a brake disc?

Also spelled “brake disk” and alternatively called a “brake rotor,” the brake disc connects with the wheel hub and spins along with the tire. It serves as the contact surface for the brake pads.

The brake disc improves over the older brake drum design. It sheds heat faster, applies more braking force, and delivers more consistent performance even when it’s slippery. Drivers will also find it easier to determine just how much pressure they need to apply to the pedal to stop smoothly.

Most brake discs feature a single disc. High-performance units feature a pair of connected rotors in a side-by-side arrangement that helps the brake disc cool even faster and improves its ability to stop the car.

If you own a modern car, its front wheels come equipped with disc brakes while the rear wheels use drum brakes. Luxury vehicles and high-end models feature disc brakes for all four wheels. Finally, classic vehicles use drum brakes, although they can upgrade to compatible disc brakes.

What is a brake caliper?

The brake caliper is a mechanical assembly that surrounds the brake disc. Mounted on a bracket attached to the vehicle, it looks like a c-clamp and works like one, too.

Brake caliper types

Brake calipers come in two types, floating calipers and fixed calipers. Disc brakes get classified according to the caliper they use.

Floating caliper

The most numerous type, the floating caliper also goes by the name “sliding caliper.” It can have either one or two hydraulic pistons mounted on the inner brake pad while the other pad attaches to the caliper itself.

When you hit the brakes, the pistons push the inner brake pad against the disc. Meanwhile, the caliper itself approaches the disc to press the outer pad into the rotor. Caught between the two pads, the disk produces an enormous amount of friction.

Fixed/Opposed piston caliper

As its name implies, a fixed caliper cannot move from its mount. Instead, it features one or more hydraulic pistons on each side of the rotor. The brake pads sit on these caliper pistons.

Stepping on the brakes activates the caliper pistons. They push the brake pads into both sides of the brake disc while the brake caliper stays in place.

Disc brake designs

Manufacturers experimented with the surface of disc brakes to make them last longer and work more efficiently. The designs born from their efforts came with advantages and disadvantages.

Solid/Plain surface discs

Essentially a solid block of cast iron, plain surface discs deliver adequate performance. They cost far less than other designs thanks to their cheap material and simple method of manufacture. However, they weigh a figurative ton and don’t shed heat well.

Vented discs

To improve heat management, the vented disc introduced cooling channels that run between the rotor’s faces. The channels radiated heat, thereby extending the part’s service life by reducing the risk of cracks and damage caused by intense heat.

Many modern cars use vented discs. The original straight channels gave way to curvier designs that improved the airflow and cooling.

Drilled discs

Drilling holes through the brake disc reduces its weight and provides an avenue of escape for the gases produced by friction between the brake pad and the rotor. They also look fantastic from their spot behind the wheel hub.

Drilled discs still appear on many high-performance cars. While the holes weaken the disc’s structural strength, manufacturers can make it strong enough to withstand cracking.

Dimpled discs

To get the benefit of drilling holes without weakening the disc itself, this design doesn’t drill all the way through. The “dimples” provide enough space for the gases that often cause brake fade.

Slotted/Grooved discs

Other brake discs feature grooves or slots bored through their surface. Like dimples, the channels allow gases to escape while maintaining the disc’s structural integrity.

They can also clean the brake pads that pass over them, albeit at the expense of wearing out the pads faster. Finally, some groove designs can also reduce the vibrations caused by the contact between the disc and the pads.

Waved discs

Introduced on motorcycles, waved discs recently made their way into some cars. Their surfaces feature shapes that resemble waves to save weight, get rid of heat faster, and look spectacular.

Brake disc materials

The materials that make up the brake disc also affect its cost, lifespan, and performance. Popular choices include:

Cast iron

Many brake discs use cast iron. The metal costs little to produce and form into the right shape. However, iron is heavy and radiates heat less efficiently.

Ceramic

Ceramic brake discs weigh less and vent heat better than cast iron counterparts. They cost more than iron discs.

Carbon ceramic

If you want the best performance money can buy, go for carbon ceramic brake discs. They boast the highest resistance to heat and associated warping, and they also weigh far less than cast iron discs.

For best results, pair up carbon ceramic disc brakes with the right brake pads. They’ll cost a pretty penny, but you get what you pay for and more.

How much does a brake disc and caliper kit cost?

Getting a new brake disc and caliper kit to replace your old one can cost you anywhere between $119 and $1,127. The price tag depends on the manufacturer’s brand, the vehicle’s model, the number of disc brakes, and their performance.

Brake disc and caliper kits come in sets intended for either two-wheel or four-wheel disc brake systems. Some replacement kits match the abilities of the stock parts, others offer better braking power, and still others deliver performance levels found on race tracks.

How to Shop for a Good Brake Disc and Caliper Kit

The brake disc and caliper kit is one of the brake system components that are responsible for making your car decelerate whenever you step on the brake pedal. The caliper basically exerts the right amount of pressure needed to slow the disc's rotation. These two components work hand in hand to keep you safe on the road. Considering the amount of strain you put on the kit every time you brake, replacing it after miles of use is mandatory to keep your safety from being compromised. When shopping for a new brake disc and caliper kit, here are a few dos and don'ts to keep in mind:

Dos

  • Make sure that you get a brake disc and caliper kit that suits your driving habits. This component is available in different types, each type suiting a specific driving style. If you're on the lookout for optimum braking performance without any risk of overheating problems, you should go for a kit with cross-drilled or slotted discs.
  • Consider the road and traffic conditions that you usually drive on. If you're not constantly doing a stopandgo kind of driving amidst city traffic, then a kit with a regular cast iron brake disc would do a fine job for you.
  • Know the specifications of the brake disc and caliper kit required for your car. The last thing you want is to buy a kit that doesn't fit your car properly.
  • Check your vehicle's identification number (VIN). The VIN is particularly useful for finding the right brake caliper for your car. You can just look up this number over the internet and it will tell you your vehicle's manufacturer and model year code. Finding a compatible brake disc and caliper kit is going to be one less thing to worry about with the help of the VIN.
  • Ensure that you buy a brake disc and caliper kit with the highest quality to avoid additional expenses. Its metallurgy and design are some of the things you should consider.

Don'ts

  • DON'T buy a remanufactured brake disc and caliper kit without double-checking if it's in good condition.
  • DON'T settle for a cheap brake disc and caliper kit manufactured by unknown brands. Its quality and longevity may not be as good as those kits produced by well-known companies.

Replacing Your Car’s Brake Disc and Caliper Kit Like a Pro

Your vehicle's brake disc and caliper kit gets used quite a lot, and this is why it's not really surprising for it to get damaged after a while. There are many reasons why this vital component might fail, including overuse and lack of proper maintenance. If you notice your car pulling to one side or producing disturbing sounds and vibrations when braking, then it could mean that the kit is due for a replacement. Installing a new brake disc and pad kit may be done at the comfort of your own garage. Here are some of the things you'll need and the installation steps to help you out:

Difficulty level: Difficult

Tools that you'll need:

  • Wrench set
  • Floor jack
  • Jack stands
  • Screwdrivers
  • Caliper brake piston turning tool
  • Brake bleeding set
  • Drain pan
  • Brake fluid
  • Caliper lubricant
  • Rubber mallet
  • Replacement brake disc and caliper kit

Step 1: Park your car over an area with a level surface to make sure that it won't shift while you're doing the rest of the replacement procedures.

Step 2: Lift your car off the ground using a jack and support it with the jack stands.

Step 3: Remove the vehicle's wheel by unfastening its lug nuts.

Step 4: Using a wrench, remove the banjo bolt that's connecting the brake caliper to the brake hose.

Step 5: Remover the bolts that are securing the caliper in its mounting location using a wrench. Place the drain pan below the brake caliper to catch any brake fluid leak while you slide it off from the wheel.

Step 6: With a screwdriver, detach the screws of the brake disc and carefully pull it off the wheel hub. If needed, lightly tap it using a rubber mallet for an easier removal.

Step 7: Put the new brake disc and caliper kit in place and secure it using the same bolts and screws you removed earlier. Make sure that you apply the right amount of torque to keep the assembly from detaching while in use.

Step 8: Set the wheel back and reattach its lug nuts.

The whole process of changing a brake disc and caliper kit may take about two hours for an expert DIYer to finish and almost three hours for a beginner. Don't forget to practice safety precautions while doing this task!

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